Fertilization

Deep Root Fertilization

Trees that grow in the woods naturally fertilize themselves. Leaves fall to the ground, decompose, and break down into a nutrient rich soil. Trees that grow in our yards usually have their leaves cleaned up, compete with grass roots for nutrients, and have to deal with a more compacted soil to grow their roots in. Soil compaction is primarily caused from machines at the time of home construction and day to day foot/mower traffic.

One way to make sure your trees are getting the nutrients they need is from deep root fertilization. We drill a series of holes under neath the canopy of the tree, also called the drip line, and then fill the holes with a combination of top soil and slow release fertilizer. This technique ensures that nutrients are in the root zone, allows more air into the root zone, helps counter soil compaction, and improves the quality of the soil in the root zone.

Trunk Injection Fertilization

This technique involves using a tree IV system  We place liquid fertilizer in a small tank which we pressurize.  The fertilizer moves from the tank through tubes and needles into the tree.  Small holes are drilled at the trunk flare where the needles are placed.

This technique is used when the root system of a tree cannot take up fertilization placed in the soil.  This could be due to a portion of the tree’s root system that was recently cut (new construction), declining health or a covered root system (asphalt, concrete, deck, etc.)